“If you only knew it, you are in luck not to have a heart”

#19: Read Wizard of Oz

IMG_3849
Like Alice in Wonderland (which I read a few weeks ago (see a few posts ago)), to read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was something I have always wanted to do. As an education major, and as someone who thinks literacy for children is extremely important, I thought reading a classic children’s novel like The Wonderful Wizard of Oz would prove to be beneficial and fun. I was right.

I did really enjoy Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, but The (Wonderful) Wizard of Oz was more enjoyable and easy for me to read. Despite that, L. Frank Baum’s Wizard of Oz is much scarier than I had thought it would be. This is because I only knew the story as it is told in the 1939 film version, The Wiz, and Wicked (if you want to count that).

Baum’s novel dives MUCH deeper into the story than the movie does. We discover how Oz came to the land and what he did when he got there. We discover why the Tin Woodman is made of tin. We discover what happens to Dorthey’s comrades in the end. Several different characters are in the book, all colorful and magical. Many different scenes and adventures are in the book, that make the foursome’s journey seem much more harrowing.

If you have not read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, I really think you should. It kind of makes me upset that the very famous 1939 adaption is not as detailed and adventurous as the novel is. You’ll have a lot of questions answered, I think.

 

Thanks,

Samantha

 

P.S. Whoa! Just realized you can add pictures that WordPress offers. Cool! Here’s one.

Caption: She caught Toto by the ear. An illust...

Caption: She caught Toto by the ear. An illustration by W. W. Denslow from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, also known as The Wizard of Oz, a 1900 children’s novel by L. Frank Baum. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Advertisements

One thought on ““If you only knew it, you are in luck not to have a heart”

  1. Pingback: The Secret of Oz Full Documentary | Burning Uranus

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s