“Here once the embattled farmers stood, and fired the shot heard round the world”

#23: Go to Lexington and Concord

Andrew, Concord native, and I in front of the Minuteman statue

Andrew, Concord native, and I in front of the Minuteman statue

When I was young (7 years old), I went to Concord, Massachusetts for the first time. I remember really liking it. I remember going to Louisa May Alcott‘s house and going on the tour. I remember there was a lot of walking. I don’t remember anything else, though, so I wanted to go back at some point in my life.

At school last fall I met who would soon become one of my dearest friends: Andrew. Andrew mentioned to me that he was from Concord and that’s where he “goes home” to during breaks. This made me really excited and brought back what few memories I had from the town. I remember sitting with him in the dining commons few weeks before summer vacation, looking up Concord, and asking him if he knew certain things about it/where certain things were. He seemed to know a lot about his hometown and I decided that I would visit him during the summer vacation. He said he would give me a tour of Concord; I was excited.

A few days ago, Jojo (who you’ve seen in a few posts now) and I decided we were going to the beach Tuesday (which was yesterday). Seeing that it was going to rain and thunder, I asked her if she instead wanted to join me in visiting Andrew in Concord and also stopping by in the nearby Lexington, which is also filled with history. She agreed! I asked Andrew if he was willing to give us a tour Tuesday and he said he could after he got out of work. Jojo and I decided to go a few hours before he got out of work so we could look around Lexington.

Jojo and I hit the road around 10:30 AM. Lexington is about two hours from us and after a Vine-filled, music-filled, gossip-filled road trip we were in Lexington. I noticed some signs that pointed to historical things there and followed those. We ended up in a cute little downtown. We drove by the Battle Green trying to find a place to park.

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Jojo and I, both obsessed with sushi, first Yelped for a sushi place in the area. We found a nice place, Dabin, right in town and decided on there. Though a little more expensive than our usual Northampton sushi, it was super delicious.

Jojo and our delicious food

Jojo and our delicious food

While we waited for our lunch we sketched each other

While we waited for our lunch we sketched each other

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After lunch we decided to walk around Lexington a bit and check out some of the places there that Andrew suggested we look at. One was the Munroe Tavern and we decided to scope that one out. We walked by the Lexington Farmer’s Market (we were excited we came on a good day but then realized they’re open every Tuesday) and looked around a bit there.

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We asked one of the people there how to get to Munroe’s Tavern and they gave us easy directions. They told us that they figured the British American people in the town were keeping it there because the building was used by the British during the Revolutionary War.

As we walked up Massachusetts Avenue we saw some really old houses and other things.

Jojo in front of a very old looking phone or alarm or something

Jojo in front of a very old looking phone or alarm or something

Yours truly in front of Raymond Tavern

Yours truly in front of Raymond Tavern

We then got to Munroe Tavern, which stands alone on a little hill.

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The sign says: "Lexington Historical Society" and "Munroe Tavern 1735 British Field Hospital and Headquarters April 19, 1775"

The sign says: “Lexington Historical Society” and “Munroe Tavern 1735 British Field Hospital and Headquarters April 19, 1775″

We went on the property and discovered that they had a little garden growing in the back/side of the tavern.

Sign says: "Colonial Flowers: A collection of flowers grown in the Boston area before 1830 maintained by the Lexington Field and Garden Club"

Sign says: “Colonial Flowers: A collection of flowers grown in the Boston area before 1830 maintained by the Lexington Field and Garden Club”

Jojo "fell"

Jojo “fell”

IMG_5744 IMG_5745 IMG_5746 IMG_5747 IMG_5748After our lunch, the $7 for the tour of the Tavern was a little too pricy but we looked around the lobby for a while a read a timeline on the wall of the war. We then walked back to our car and drove over to the next town, Concord. We parked by Caesar Robin’s house and waited for Andrew to get out of work.

It was so nice to see Andrew again! I also loved how excited he was to show us around his town; he even brought a map from his job at the Hawthorne Inn (now hiring!).

The first place he took us was to the Old North Bridge or the North Bridge. Before the bridge is the Battle Monument. According to the book my mom bought last time we went to Concord (the book is called ” Colonial Concord 1775-1975: A Study in Pen and Ink” by James H. Dee Jr), the monument is granite and marks the spot where the British soldiers fired ay the American Patriots across the river.

The Battle Monument

The Battle Monument with the North Bridge in the background

The Battle Monument has the following words inscribed on it:

HERE

ON THE 19TH OF APRIL,

1775

WAS MADE

THE FIRST FORCEABLE RESISTANCE

TO BRITISH AGGRESSION.

ON THE OPPOSITE BANK

STOOF THE AMERICAN MILTIA.

HERE STOOD THE INVADING ARMY;

AND ON THIS SPOT

THE FIRST OF THE ENEMY FELL

IN THE WAR OF THAT REVOLUTION

WHICH GAVE

INDEPENDENCE

TO THESE UNITED STATES.

IN GRATITUDE TO GOD

AND

IN THE LOVE OF FREEDOM

THIS MONUMENT

WAS ERECTED

A.D. 1836

To the left of the monument the grave of the British soldiers.

Grave of the British soilders

Grave of the British soldiers

We then crossed the bridge, or posed on it.

Andrew posing

Andrew posing

Across the bridge is The Minuteman, a bronze statue. Andrew told us the statue was sculpted by the same man who did the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., Daniel Chester French. We took a few pictures of the statue.

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Inscribed: BY THE RUDE BRIDGE THAT ARCHED THE FLOOD THEIR FLAG TO APRIL'S BREEZE UNFURLED HERE ONCE THE EMBATTLED FARMERS STOOD AND FIRED THE SHOT HEARD ROUND THE WORLD

Inscribed: BY THE RUDE BRIDGE THAT ARCHED THE FLOOD THEIR FLAG TO APRIL’S BREEZE UNFURLED HERE ONCE THE EMBATTLED FARMERS STOOD AND FIRED THE SHOT HEARD ROUND THE WORLD

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After the North Bridge, we got into Andrew’s car and we really started the tour. I told him I wanted to see The Bullet Hole House, a house that stored ammunition for the war that was hit by a stray bullet. Apparently, you can still see the bullet to this day. Andrew looked in my book at the name of the man who lived there (Colonel Barret) and then on his map, and drove us there.

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The house was lined with nails? that looked like bullet holes

The house was lined with nails? that looked like bullet holes

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But we couldn't find THE bullet hole

But we couldn’t find THE bullet hole

Andrew then brought us to the house of Ralph Waldo Emerson. It’s huge! We missed the hours to go in but it was nice to look at the outside.

Side of the house

Side of the house

Front of the house

Front of the house

Plaque

Plaque

Andrew showed us his workplace, the Nathaniel Hawthorne Inn, which is right across the street from Nathaniel Hawthorne’s house, called Wayside. It was under construction but I got this picture of it:

Nathaniel Hawthorne's house, not to be confused with the House of the Seven Gables, which I went to last week.

Nathaniel Hawthorne’s house, not to be confused with the House of the Seven Gables, which I went to last week.

Andrew took us down the street to Louisa May Alcott’s house, called Orchard House. As I said, I remembered going here when I went to Concord as a young girl.

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We looked around the gift shop and then went to the backyard where the Concord School of Philosophy is (or the Hillside Chapel)

Hillside Chapel

Hillside Chapel

Jojo and a Y tree

Jojo and a Y tree

IMG_5773Then we went for ice cream

IMG_5790And decided to eat it at Walden Pond.

When we got to the reservation, Andrew showed us Thoreau’s Cabin, a replica of Thoreau’s cabin in the woods that you can go in and explore. Outside of his cabin is a sculpture of him.

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Then we walked across the street to the actual pond and played in the water a little bit.

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Andrew drove us through town to the Sleepy Hollow Cemetery. I loved this part of the trip mostly because I love old cemeteries.

Helpful sign showing where "Author's Ridge" is, the place where Thoreau, Hawthorne, Alcotts, and Emerson are buried

Helpful sign showing where “Author’s Ridge” is, the place where Thoreau, Hawthorne, Alcotts, and Emerson are buried

Daniel Chester French was also buried here

Daniel Chester French was also buried here

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Author's Ridge is up that ramp on the left

Author’s Ridge is up that ramp on the left

Jojo was the one who noticed the arrow

Jojo was the one who noticed the arrow

Walking up the slope

Walking up the slope

The Thoreau family plotting

The Thoreau family plotting

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Henry David Thoreau's grave

Henry David Thoreau’s grave

Hawthorne family

Hawthorne family

We figured this was Nathaniel's.

We figured this was Nathaniel’s.

Alcott family

Alcott family

Louisa May Alcott's grave

Louisa May Alcott’s grave

And the Little Women

And the Little Women

Emerson's grave

Emerson’s grave

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His wife

His wife

Andrew drove us to another part of the cemetery, Melvin Memorial, or “Mourning Victory”. This memorial is for three brothers who died during the Civil War. The fourth brother is the one who commissioned the memorial.

The memorial

The memorial

One for each brother

One for each brother

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View from the memorial

View from the memorial

Jojo sketched it

Jojo sketched it

Andrew then drove us to Great Meadows. This was probably my favorite part of the trip. We parked and climbed the tower and saw this:

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It was so nice!

Concord is such a cool town and Jojo and I had such a blast. I learned about the battles at Lexington and Concord, I got to spend time with my friends, and I got to see cool historical places and nice settings. I definitely recommend making a trip to Concord if you haven’t yet; it’s awesome.

Thanks,

Samantha

One thought on ““Here once the embattled farmers stood, and fired the shot heard round the world”

  1. Pingback: Classic Guest Author. Nathaniel Hawthorne | Just Olga

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